Recent Storm Damage Posts

What to Do After a Hurricane Strikes

9/26/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage What to Do After a Hurricane Strikes After a hurricane strikes your area, there are certain steps you should and should not take.

Hurricanes can be devastating, and to many Brevard County residents, Irma was just that. If your home had damages caused by the hurricane, here are the immediate steps you should take.

Photograph and Document Damage

Dealing with your insurance company is not always a walk in the park, but by documenting your damages, the process can go a lot smoother. Take photos of all damages, both inside and outside of your home. Also create a list of all damaged contents inside your home such as water damaged furniture.

Conduct Emergency Repairs

In many insurance policies, it suggests it is your responsibility to stop any future damages from occurring. For example, if you have a large hole in your roof, you need to place a tarp over the hole to prevent rain and other elements from causing further damages. Don’t make any permanent repairs until your insurance adjusters come out to reviews your home’s damages.

Secure Home Inventory

By securing your home inventory, this will help your claim process go much easier. A home inventory is a document detailing all your possessions in the home. Your inventory should include photos, detailed descriptions, and if possible, the item’s receipts.

File a Claim ASAP

If you experienced damages to your home from the hurricane, you should file a claim immediately. Be prepared to explain all the damages that occurred to your home in detail. This will help your insurance provider in starting your initial claim, and they can also provide you with some advice while waiting for your adjuster to come and assess the damages firsthand.

Secure Safe Lodging

If your home is damaged to the extent where it is no longer fit to live in, you will need to secure a place for you and your family to stay in the meantime. Check your insurance policy to see if you have coverage for temporary lodging while your home is being repaired. In standard homeowner’s insurance policy, this is typically covered as long as the overall damage to your home is part of the covered insurance claim.

7 Steps in Preparing For a Hurricane

6/30/2017 (Permalink)

Even though hurricane season has just begun, it’s never too early to prepare. Unless you prefer to rush to several different stores and stand in hour long lines, within hours of the hurricane actually hitting.  I know I’d rather not do that! I’ve been in that situation, and let me tell you, it is not fun.

Instead, follow these 7 steps you should take before a hurricane hits.

1. Stay Informed

Make sure you know what is going on with the hurricane. Such as, what is the category of the storm, will it be hitting your area directly, if so, what time?  Make sure to know your county’s evacuation route, and customize your evacuation plan for your family specifically. The hurricane’s course is never set in stone, so be sure to establish a back-up plan for every scenario. There are great phone apps you can download and utilize while preparing your family’s hurricane plans and staying informed. Click Here to learn more about these apps.

2. Make a Hurricane Preparedness Checklist

Be sure that you create a checklist of supplies that is specific to you and your family and then more general supplies. Click Here

3. Do you have Hurricane Shutters?

Be proactive! Hurricanes are known for causing damage to houses, and the first thing that’s usually damaged is your windows. Florida Home Builder’s know this and sometimes provide hurricane shutters to new homes. Make sure to check and see if yours has or not.  If not, you can purchase shutters or you can pre-cut boards for your house windows.

4. Have a Back-up Power Source

During hurricanes, it is likely that power lines get damaged or fall down, causing many people to go without power after the hurricane. It can take several days to several weeks for your local power company to repair the power line and get power up and running again. Because of this, it is a good idea to have a generator. Remember that they need gas to run and they are quite noisy.

5. Have at least 2 weeks of water and non-perishable food

FEMA recommends that each household has 2 weeks of food supplied. Hopefully you will not need to 2 weeks worth of food, but disasters do happen, and hurricanes can change on a flip of a dime. It is always best to be over prepared than under prepared.

6. Know How to Cook Without Electric

Without electric it can be hard to cook or warm up some of your food; considering this day of age, we rarely cooks without electric. But instead of trying to figure out how you are going to heat up the can foods you stocked up on, decide this issue before hand. Here are some ways you can cook without electric.

  • Fireplace
  • Canned heat
  • Camping stoves
  • Grills- propane or charcoal 

7. Remember to Relax and Stay Calm

Being relaxed and calm during disasters are much easier when your family and you are prepared for any kind of scenario a hurricane throws your way. Come up with some ideas and activities that can take your mind off of the storm or its aftermath. Pull out those dusty board games in your closet and take out the stack of books you’ve been meaning to get to. This should preoccupy you and your family, and give you some quality time together.

Cell Phone Emergency Alerts

3/27/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Cell Phone Emergency Alerts Who know our cell phones' could possibly send a text that could potentially save a life?

Technology has come a long way!  The only way you used be able to receive Emergency information was by radio or television, but there is a better way and that is your cell phone.

Everyone has a cell phone, right?  In this day and age, we couldn’t imagine anyone not owning a cell phone; it’s practically unheard of.  More people own a cell phone than a car or a TV, and could you blame them.  You can watch TV or catch a ride from your phone in minutes.  In 2002, only 62% of U.S. adults possessed a cell phone, and that percentage increased to 95% of Americans in 2016.  Today, cell phones are used for more than just to make calls.   Cell phone capabilities aren’t what they were 10 or even 5 years ago. New technology has helped make our cell phone do practically anything, from GPS services to video chat, to web surfing, and to virtual reality.

Now knowing this, what is the best and quickest way to notify Americans in case of a major emergency?  I’d say through our cell phones!  You can be warned of upcoming dangers by emergency alerts from anywhere, while choosing how you’d like to receive them from your cell phone.  The ability to be warned of oncoming dangers at a moment’s notice can provide you with a jump-start to safety.  Here are 5 different ways to set up your emergency alerts from you cell phone.

  1. National updates

Receive updates regarding National Security from Homeland Security, the latest outbreaks from CDC, and computer threats from US-CERT.  These notifications are issued through WEA- Wireless Emergency Alerts.  If you have ever received an Amber Alert it’s coming from the WEA, which is a default setting in most cell phones.

  1. Statewide activity updates

Do a Google search for a Public Warning System for your state.  This will allow you to customize your alerts specifically to your state. 

  1. Weather apps for smart phones and tablets

You can receive custom weather alerts from your state or city while customizing the level of warning you want to receive.   Apple users can download NOAA Radar Pro and android users can download the app Pro Weather Alert.  These apps can range from $2- $3, and is worth every penny to keep you and your family notified of weather emergencies and dangers.

  1. FEMA

The FEMA text message program informs you of safety tips for specific disaster types, and allows you to search for open shelters and disaster recovery centers.

  • Apple devices-text APPLE to 43362 (4FEMA)
  • Android devices-text ANDROID to 43362 (4FEMA)
  • Blackberry devices-text BLACKBERRY to 43362 (4FEMA)
  1. Survivehive Alert Center

For those of you that are like me and hate cluttering up your email and social media, this is the resource for you. Stay up to date with the latest disaster/emergency, terrorism, disease outbreak, significant earthquake, and severe weather alerts all from one site.

Is Your Suntree Family Prepared for a Emergency?

6/15/2015 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Is Your Suntree Family Prepared for a Emergency? When a Suntree hurricane makes a direct hit, it can take out electricity, homes and businesses for months and years.

Is Your Family Prepared for a South Florida Emergency?

Are you a resident of South Florida? If you are, then you know how quickly hurricanes can hit – and the devastation they leave behind. SERVPRO is a professional restoration company that is committed to bringing your home back to life after a disaster strikes. We’ve put together the top four tips that will help you get through South Florida’s risky hurricane season – and stay as safe as you can in the midst of a long hurricane season from June 1 to Nov. 30. Here’s what you need to know to stay ahead of the hurricane season:


Tip #1: Create a Emergency Preparation Kit
When a Suntree hurricane makes a direct hit, it can take out electricity, homes and businesses for months and years. You want to have at least a two-week supply of water for each person in your home. You also want enough non-perishable food to feed everyone in your home for at least two weeks. Put together a first aid kit as well in case anyone gets hurt. Your 911 response system may get knocked out, and you need to know how to triage.


Tip #2: Power Up in Expectation of Powering Down
Charge all your cell phones. By extra batteries to operate radios and flashlights or camping lighting, such as headlamps and lanterns. Try to avoid matches and candles, as this is just another way to cause a disaster via a fire.


Tip #3: Settle on an Evacuation Plan
Make sure everyone in your family knows the plan for evacuating. Listen to officials. If you get separated, where will you meet? Decide on safe place. Plan to get out of town. Where will you go? Call friends and family who live far outside the hurricane's trajectory to make sure you can go to safe place. Stock up on gas in your car's tank and in gas-safe containers in case you can't find a gas station for many miles on your journey -- something that often happens when a big Suntree hurricane hits.


Tip #4: Board Up
Protect your windows and doors with plywood from your local home construction store. Reinforce every vulnerable part of your house -- from door hinges to the roof. Professionals at your local home construction store can help you make the right decisions for boarding up your home.

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

The 2014 National Preparedness Month Be Safe Viera!

9/14/2014 (Permalink)

Storm Damage The 2014 National Preparedness Month Be Safe Viera! SERVPRO of West Brevard supports the 2014 National Preparedness Month awareness campaign, be prepared in Palm Bay be safe!

NPM 2014 Digital Engagement Toolkit

SERVPRO of West Brevard and the  National Preparedness Community is where we connect and collaborate on emergency preparedness. Use us to empower yourself to prepare and to coordinate preparedness activities with your family, neighbors, co-workers, and those with whom you may study or worship. We contribute what we can about what we know; ask for what we need; keep doing what is working; communicate about what is not working, and when possible, offer suggestions towards solutions. When we are connected and collaborate, we are more effective and efficient at educating and empowering ourselves to prepare for disasters and emergencies.

The Ready Campaign established four universal building blocks of emergency preparedness: Be informed, Make a Plan, Build a Kit, and Get Involved. America’s PrepareAthon! builds on this foundation by encouraging millions of Americans to focus on a simple, specific activity that will increase preparedness.

America’s PrepareAthon! a new national community-based campaign for action that focuses on increasing emergency preparedness through hazard-specific drills, group discussions and exercises. National PrepareAthon! Days are held every spring and fall. During National Preparedness Month we ask you, your family, community and workplace to take action by planning a National PrepareAthon! Day on or around September 30th. We recommend using digital media tools as a way to promote National Preparedness Month, September 1st-30th.

The 2014 National Preparedness Month theme is: “Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”.

If you are in Melbourne, Palm Bay, Viera, West Melbourne, Malabar, Satellite Beach, Melbourne Beach, Indialantic, Indian Harbour Beach, and surrounding areas and are in need of information on  Disaster Assistance, please call us at (321) 953-8600 or see http://www.fema.gov/apply for help.

Production Crew visits Atlanta, GA

1/15/2014 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Production Crew visits Atlanta, GA (Left to right) Mike, Jesse, and Robby taking a quick break.

SERVPRO of South Brevard's crew is up in Atlanta, GA for a few weeks helping them recover from burst pipes caused by the recent cold!  They have been extremely busy and are taking a quick break before they finish demo in an affected house!